Making Sense of the Blood Bowl Sutra: Gender, Pollution, and Salvation in Buddhist Sermons from Early Modern Japan

Sometime during the late fourteenth or early fifteenth century, several variants of an indigenous Chinese sutra known as the Xuepenjing 血盆経 (“Blood Bowl Sutra,” Jpns. Ketsubonkyō), were transmitted to Japan. Emphasizing the impurity of women’s reproductive blood, this short scripture teaches that women are

Making Sense of the Blood Bowl Sutra: Gender, Pollution, and Salvation in Buddhist Sermons from Early Modern Japan

Sometime during the late fourteenth or early fifteenth century, several variants of an indigenous Chinese sutra known as the Xuepenjing 血盆経 (“Blood Bowl Sutra,” Jpns. Ketsubonkyō), were transmitted to Japan. Emphasizing the impurity of women’s reproductive blood, this short scripture teaches that women are

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Shinran’s Devotional Hymn of Prince Shotoku: Kōtaishi Shōtoku hōsan

The Fall 2010 Numata Lecture at the Institute of Buddhist Studies was delivered by Prof. Kenneth Lee of the California State University, Northridge. Prof. Lee discussed Shinran Shonin’s wasan, the Kōtaishi Shōtoku hōsan in devotion to Prince Shotoku, revered as the founder of Buddhism in Japan.

Shinran’s Devotional Hymn of Prince Shotoku: Kōtaishi Shōtoku hōsan (audio version)

The Fall 2010 Numata Lecture at the Institute of Buddhist Studies was delivered by Prof. Kenneth Lee of the California State University, Northridge. Prof. Lee discussed Shinran Shonin’s wasan, the Kōtaishi Shōtoku hōsan in devotion to Prince Shotoku, revered as the founder of Buddhism in Japan.

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How Dhāraṇīs Were Proto-tantric: Ritual Uses of Buddhist Spells in Dunhuang and Beyond

The 2010 Spring Numata Lecture was delivered by Jacob Dalton on April 30, 2010. The following episode is the audio-only version of Prof. Dalton’s talk. The Tibetan manuscripts from Dunhuang include a large number of copied dhāraṇīs, both sÅ«tras and